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The CHANGE Framework

Community & Economy

Education

Hawaii’s children and youth deserve to be educated and prepared for work, life, and citizenship as contributors to the future of Hawaii.

Hawaii Business Change Reports

Hawaii Business Magazine

Education

Read the April edition of the Hawaii Business Magazine's Change Reports on Education in our state.

Indicator: Healthy Early Childhood and School Readiness
Only half of Hawaii’s 92,000 four-year-olds get quality early education experiences, in spite of the economic research proving that quality education and intervention in a child’s earliest years is the greatest return on investment (13%) for both the child and society. Conversely, adverse early environments create deficits in skills and abilities that drive down productivity and increase social costs. (James Heckman, Ph.D., Nobel Prize-winning economist).

Data point

  • While 64% of young children in Hawaii need childcare because their parents work, the state has only enough DHS-regulated childcare seats to serve 25% of children under age 6. In Hawaii, 53% (19,000) of 3- and 4-year-olds are not enrolled in preschool; the figure is 60% for poor 3- and 4-year-olds.

Change Framework Graph 20

Source: Hawaii Wellbeing Data Project
Percentage of children enrolled in early childhood education (from lowest/light 3.1% to highest/dark 10.3%, by House legislative districts, 2016).

Summary
There is an overall shortage of early childhood seats, with an especially critical shortage of infant-toddler care and regions of the state that are childcare deserts.

Efforts underway

Related sources

Indicator: Effective and High-Quality Education
A high-quality education system prepares children not only for college and work, but also for success in life as adults and citizens. Given the proven correlation between increased skills of students on subsequent economic growth of the state, Hawaii’s public education system becomes a vitally important economic engine. (EducationNext)

Data point

  • 23% of fourth graders in Hawaii are chronically absent. Missing at least 2 days per month negatively affects student academic performance. Chronic absence by 6th grade is a leading indicator that a student will drop out of high school. Missing 15 or more school days due to absence for any reason—excused, unexcused absences, and suspensions—can translate into third-graders unable to master reading, sixth-graders failing subjects, and ninth-graders dropping out of high school.
  • 83% of 9th graders in Hawaii graduate from high school on time. Unfortunately, this number has not changed in 10 years. Our schools lose 17% to dropout and failure to graduate on time.

Change Framework Graph 21

Source: Hawaii Wellbeing Data Project
Percentage of students missing 15 or more days of school (from lowest/light 9% to highest/dark 30% by House legislative districts, 2017).

Summary
The mission of Hawaii’s public and independent schools is to educate and prepare future generations for success in work and life. Corporate scholarships and internships, promotion of student attendance and parent engagement, and community supports for students and families, all play a role in helping ensure that Hawaii students stay in school and are successful.

Efforts underway

Related sources

Indicator: Career and Work Readiness And Success
Education beyond high school is critically important to advancing beyond low-wage jobs. Adults with only a high school diploma have higher unemployment rates and lower earnings, whereas Hawaii residents with a college degree earn nearly $20,000 more per year than those without one.

Data point

  • Only 62% of UH-Mānoa students will complete a degree or certificate within 8 years. Community college students have even lower completion and graduation rates (22-40%).

Change Framework Graph 22

Source: Hawaii Wellbeing Data Project
Percentage of adults with a bachelor’s degree (from lowest/light 12% to highest/dark 57% by House legislative districts, 2016).

Summary
More than half of new jobs and job growth will be in positions requiring at least some post-secondary training or education.

Efforts underway

Other Sources

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